Leading Questions: “I Love You, Lois Lane. Until The End of Time.”

A wonderful example of analysis of the hero and the importance of relationships.

Sequential Pictures

This article was originally published at Comics Bulletin on May 26, 2016.

Love - All-Star Superman #12

Every two weeks in a new installment of “Leading Questions”, the young, lantern jawed Mark Stack will ask Comics Bulletin’s very own Chase Magnett a question he must answer. However, Mark doesn’t plan on taking it easy on Chase. He’ll be setting him up with questions that are anything but fair and balanced to see how this once overconfident comics critic can make a cogent case for what another one obviously wants to hear.

So without any further ado…

Why are the best superhero comics love stories?

I just got out of The Lobster, which is arguably a love story. Love isn’t a genre of story though. I’m not sure what exactly you’d call it, maybe a mode or a goal? But I’m certain it’s not a genre. Romantic comedies aren’t a genre, they’re just a trope…

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Weighing Justice With a Jury of Her ‘Peers’

Weighing Justice With a Jury of Her ‘Peers’

This is such a visceral and potent piece. I highly reccomend you read it.

Longreads

Susana Morris | Longreads | September 2017 | 20 minutes (4,997 words)

I received the notice for jury duty with mild annoyance. I hoped I wouldn’t get picked as I put the date of the summons on my calendar. I thought about how jury duty would throw me off my work schedule; how I didn’t want to participate in this particular part of civic life in small town Alabama; how I didn’t want to help someone, probably another Black person, go to jail.

But I didn’t spend too much time worrying. It was summertime and the date, during a week in the middle of September, seemed an unpleasant blip on the road far ahead. I pushed it out of my mind and tried to enjoy the remaining pieces of a waning summer in my sleepy southern town.

Eventually the summer break gave way to the fall semester, though the weather…

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Fiction– hopefully one of many short stories inspired by my travels and work over the past few years dealing with themes like identity and cultural exchange

Source: Fiction– hopefully one of many short stories inspired by my travels and work over the past few years dealing with themes like identity and cultural exchange

A writer I know rather well with an enjoyable writing style has put out this awesome read, and I’m so excited to read him again. Go give a little love, why don’t you?

Reblog: Self-Published Fantasy Blog-OFf

So, this is a slightly belated introduction/ post on the Self-Published Fantasy Blog-Off 2017, Mark Lawrence’s third annual self-publishing competition extravaganza. 300 fantasy novels are sent to 10 different bloggers who will, over the course of 2017, choose 1 winner. The one book to rule us all. Or something. As Mark Lawrence himself says: “There’s no […]

via Indie Spotlight 1: Self-Published Fantasy Blog-Off — Antonio Urias

This sounds really fascinating to me. Who knows we may discover some new and exciting authors! I’m rather excited to check this out

Why ‘The Bold Type’ Is the Rare Show That Does Right by Millennials — IndieWire

Scan the average national news source and millennials are being blamed for the decline in everything from the oil industry to the beer business. (Even IndieWire has placed the demise of the DVR at their feet.) With a murky, nebulous attitude toward an emerging generation, it’s difficult for shows based primarily around millennial characters to…

via Why ‘The Bold Type’ Is the Rare Show That Does Right by Millennials — IndieWire

A guide to writing fight scenes

This is a really thought provoking blog on how to approach writing fight scenes. It is very tempting, for young writers and new writers, to make action scenes into anime or the Matrix (OR the Ani-Matrix). Once upon a time I was one of them, but it quickly became apparent that it didn’t work. Fiction text isn’t the same as what appears on the screen. Clarity should top flashiness, mood should always be conveying the tone you intend, and the closer you get to those fighting the more you use the possibilities of fiction to their full capabilities. BUT that’s just my take, what do you all think?

Richie Billing

On social media, forums and Reddit of late I’ve seen quite a few people asking about writing fight scenes. So this week, with axes in hand, I thought we’d battle our way through it.


There seems to be a few general rules of thumb for writing fight scenes. They are:

  • Blow by blow is boring;
  • Clarity is king;
  • Show v tell.

Let’s look at each in detail.

Blow by blow is boring

blow by blow

“He swung left, then right, dodged a lunging blow from behind, rolled to the right, raised his sword to parry another attack.”

A fight scene should not be a stream of blow after blow until everyone’s dead or retreated. Rather, it ought to be a portrayal of a character’s physical and mental state as they experience danger. 

 In movies seeing every punch and kick, decapitation or shooting is sadistically entertaining. On the page it’s a different…

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